Plato's Symposium and Ficino's Commentary agree in 'the vision of spiritual love as an ennobling force, in contrast to carnal love, which debases, a vision which in Socrates' speech pro- duces the famous description of a ladder of love leading up to the pure idea of the good and the beautiful.' Platonism and Christianity, seen as love, are one; and the term "Platonic love," which Ficino invented, embraces love in its widest sense. Much of the details of Marsilio Ficino’s life have come from Giovanni Corsi’s “ The Life of Marsilio Ficino” which was written seven years after Ficino’s death in 1506 and from the twelve volumes of letters he sent to his friends and leaders all over Europe and England that Ficino meticulously copied and saved. Love … Marsilio Ficino's "A Theological Dialogue between God and the Soul" year 1460 ... "There are four aspects of divine Frenzy,and love is the foremost of all"-Marsilio Ficino by Joe Kiernan. This volume consists of 21 essays on Marsilio Ficino (1433-99), the great Florentine scholar, philosopher and priest who was the architect of Renaissance Platonism and whose long-lasting influence on philosophy, love and music theory, medicine and magic extended across Europe. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. But I will restrain myself for the present. Marsilio Ficino, leader of the Florentine Platonic movement, describes the Florentine Neoplatonic conception of beauty in his Commentary on Plato’s Symposium on Love, as the “splendor of the divine goodness’ and the “act or ray from [the Good] penetrating through Ficin… Come and join the hunt! He knew that his very essence is love. Marsilio Ficino (Letter) Why do you seek treasure far away, when it is nearby, indeed within yourself? Unable to add item to List. Marsilio Ficino's "A Theological Dialogue between God and the Soul" year 1460 ... "There are four aspects of divine Frenzy,and love is the foremost of all"-Marsilio Ficino by Joe Kiernan. It was by means of this love that the soul was seized by God, drawn towards Him, and finally united with Him. Plato and Ficino - agreement. Read 5 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. For anyone who contemplates the heavens, nothing he sets eyes upon seems immense, but the heavens themselves. There was an error retrieving your Wish Lists. If you have read one paragraph of any James Hillman book, you know Marsilio Ficino is the Godfather of archetypal psychology. Marsilio Ficino and the Problem of Desire By the time of Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), the Christian distinction be-tween sacred (non-corporeal) love and profane (sexual, corporeal) love seemed to correspond to the Platonic notion of love as either philosophical or sensual. Love Care Nothing Seek. What is the Soul? As a child he was selected by Cosimo de Medici for an education in the humanities; he later spent five years translating the works of Plato into Latin. Image of Marsilio Ficino from a manuscript in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana. While Ficino believed that the human soul pursued contemplation more or less in isolation, he acknowledged that human beings were fundamentally social. While the precise details of his early life and education remain largely unclear to us today, it can safely be said that he studied Scholastic philosophy and medicine at the University of Florence, and that he was exposed to the burgeoning educational movement of Italian Humanism. I must go no further. And you write in such a way that while you appear to bridle me, you spur me on to praise you more vigorously. Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2005, I was very excited to read this book. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading. He was an astrologer, a reviver of Neoplatonism in touch with the major academics of his day and the first translator of Plato's complete extant works into Latin. He knew that his very essence is love. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in. Ficino’s project of translating and interpreting the Platonic corpus A n easily accessible work by Ficino is the online translation with commentary by Michael Allen of Ficino's Nuptial Arithmetic , a fascinating study of geometry, Pythagorean mathematics and astrology. “Double bewitchment”: Love-Beams, the Mutual Gaze, and the Interpenetrating Visions of Marsilio Ficino’s De Amore I have been arguing for a medieval and early modern paramaterial phantasy which paradoxically positioned the phantasy and its spirits somewhere between the material and the immaterial, and between the body and the soul. You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition. He was a priest, a doctor and musician, but is best known for his work as a translator of classic works, author and philosopher. And the Soul and Love have been found to be not far apart: where the one appears, the other is sure to be there also. See this and more Horizons courses. Ficino’s letters, lovingly translated by our Renaissance Department. And the Soul and Love have been found to be not far apart: where the one appears, the other is sure to be there also. Marsilio Ficino was born in Figline, not far from Florence, in 1433. Birth Chart: Marsilio Ficino (Libra) Marsilio Ficino (Italian: [mar?si?ljo fi?t?i?no]; Latin name: Marsilius Ficinus; 19 October 1433 1 October 1499) was an Italian scholar and Catholic priest who was one of the most influential humanist philosophers of the early Italian Renaissance. And what is Love? Marsilio Ficino. Let your feet run, but your mind need not. Copyright © 2020 Fellowship of the School of Economic Science. He knew that his very essence is love. Since Ficino asserts that love is the basis of magic, and indeed, the key link that ensures the unity of the Cosmos, his Commentary on Plato's renowned work on love is of great interest. As the first text in the series, I'm teaching the 'De Amore' as a foundational treatise in Renaissance Natural Magic. Marsilio Ficino to the magnanimous Lorenzo de’Medici: greetings. A webinar with Professor Denis Robichaud (University of Notre Dame). Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), the great philosopher of Renaissance Florence, was an Italian scholar, a Catholic priest, an astrologer, and a reviver of Neoplatonism. While Ficino believed that the human soul pursued contemplation more or less in isolation, he acknowledged that human beings were fundamentally social. A must for your archetypal library. He also knew that the essence of all humanity is love. In 1439, Florentine banking magnate Cosimo de’ Medici started attending philosophical lectures by Gemistos Plethon, a … Later in 1469, Marsilio Ficino put forward a theory of neo-platonic love in which he defines love as a personal ability of an individual which guides their soul towards cosmic processes and lofty spiritual goals and heavenly ideas (De Amore, Les Belles Lettres, 2012). It also analyzes reviews to verify trustworthiness. For other gods finally reveal themselves with difficulty, for a short time, after you have sought them for a long time. In spite of Ficino's indebtedness to earlier schemes, it appears on closer examination that his hierarchy differs i… You Mind Your Feet. He was a priest, a doctor and musician, but is best known for his work as a translator of classic works, author and philosopher. According to Ficino, love is the desire for beauty, which is the image of the divine. Ficino's is a wisdom received through reading Plato's 'Symposium,' making this philosophical treatise truly a text for today's philosophers, lovers of wisdom. The bond between Ficino and the other members was their mutual love, based on the love of the Self in each. In 1489 he was accused of heresy before Pope Innocent VIII and needed strong defense to preserve him from condemnation. The School of Philosophy and Economic Science, Registered charity numbers 313115 and SC039950. Ficino's treatise is referred to as the 'De Amore,' 'On Love' among Ficino-lovers. Share with your friends. He also knew that the essence of all humanity is love. Quotations by Marsilio Ficino, Italian Philosopher, Born October 19, 1433. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.